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RELST 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: AMST 2112, ASRC 2112, HIST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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RELST 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
Crosslisted as: ARAB 2204, ASRC 2204 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).
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RELST 2209 : Daoist Traditions
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2289, CAPS 2209, HIST 2209 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will examine the modes of philosophical and spiritual inquiry, varieties of spiritual/bodily cultivation and practice, and religious organizations and movements in China that we know as Daoist (or "Taoist"). We will examine the ways in which Daoism was used variously to contest or legitimate imperial political power, and how the procedures and ideologies of the imperial state in turn informed Daoist theory and practice.  Throughout, we will examine the ways in which standard modern western dichotomies, such as sacred/secular, spiritual/physical, and mind/body, break down when we try to apply them to the study of Daoism.  Course will focus on the period from the fourth century B.C.E. to the thirteenth century C.E. 
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RELST 2247 : Controversy and Debate in Islam
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2247, NES 2649 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Whether it is politics, society, the law, sexuality, popular culture or minorities' rights, the media are saturated with news on Islam. This course introduces topical issues in Islam as a religious, historical, cultural and political phenomenon. We will discuss this religion's manifold interpretations and investigate its multiple manifestations across the globe, giving special attention to Asia (from Iran to China, Indonesia, Afghanistan, India, Thailand, etc.). Key themes include religious devotion, the arts, Islamic law, gender, statehood, jihad, and sectarianism. No previous knowledge of Islam is required as the course covers the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon.
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RELST 2250 : Introduction to Asian Religions
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2250 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore religious traditions in South Asia (Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka) and East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) including Hinduism, Buddhism (South Asian and East Asian), Sikhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintō. We will also encounter a wide range of religious expressions, including myth, ritual, pilgrimage, mysticism, meditation, and other spiritual technologies.
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RELST 2261 : Indian Ocean Buddhism
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2261 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Long before the steamship, the airplane, the iPad and Snapchat, Buddhist monks, merchants, pilgrims and adventurers created a Buddhist network across the space of the Indian Ocean, including much of what we now refer to as southern China, India, Sri Lanka, and Southeast Asia.  Why did Buddhist travelers leave their homes for other corners of the Buddhist world? What texts, religious rituals, and magical talismans did they carry?  How did mobile persons and things create a Buddhist tradition?  Today, Indian Ocean Buddhism is strongly connected to economy and politics, as well as devotion.  How did Buddhism, politics, and economy become intertwined? How does Buddhism relate to nationalism?
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RELST 2273 : Introduction to Religious Studies: Religion and Environmental Studies
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2273, NES 2273 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course serves as both an introduction to the academic study of religion and a survey of major topics in the intersections of religious communities and environmentally sustainable practices.  Using real cases of environmentally sustainable, religiously oriented communities, we explore how myth, ritual, symbols, doctrines, and ideologies of time and space are activated in practical living decisions.  This class involves readings of both primary sources, poetry and literature, secondary sources, films and site visits.
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RELST 2277 : Meditation in Indian Culture
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2277 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course probes the truths behind traditional claims of the priority of internal practice in Indian traditions. We will examine both practices themselves - techniques of meditation and contemplation - religious ways of using intellect, forms of chant and ritual, and the dynamics through which these have left a wider mark on South Asian civilization. These dynamics include not only the evident reverberations of practice in philosophical reflection and socioreligious institutions, but also wide-ranging processes of stylization, elaboration, and popularization found throughout South Asian culture. In order to get a sense of the experiences treated in classical religious texts, students will be expected to experiment with some basic meditation practices. At least as important for the work of the course (and much more important for the grade) will be the ways in which students situate these practices within larger South Asian world views as suggested by doctrines, rituals, iconic forms, and literary texts. To keep the interaction between internal practice and broader world views central, we will examine both Hindu and Buddhist sources, consistently examining the ways in which similar practices are given distinct shapes by the two religious traditions.
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RELST 2299 : Buddhism
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2299 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the Buddhist tradition from its origins in ancient India to its migrations throughout Asia and eventually to the West. The first part of the course will deal with Indian Buddhism: the Buddha, the principal teachings and practices of his early followers, and new developments in spiritual orientation. We will then turn to the transmission of Buddhism to Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, where at least one of the early schools has been preserved. Next we will look at Mahayana Buddhism as it moves north and east, encompassing China, Japan, and Tibet. While much of the course will be devoted to developments in traditional times, we will also look at some of the ways Buddhist cultures have responded to modernity.
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RELST 2330 : Religion and Social Life
Crosslisted as: SOC 2330 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Global conflicts, raising children, electing presidents, praying for a loved one: from the mundane to the extraordinary, religion plays a significant role in social life, regardless of whether or not one considers oneself "religious."  In this course we will investigate religion and its impacts in society from a sociological perspective.  Questions we will ask include:  How does religion "fit" into society?  What are the contours of contemporary religion in the United States and around the world?  How do religious identities interact with other aspects of social life, including gender, race and politics?  In what ways have religions and religious life changed over time?  As social scientists, how can we best study religion?  The course will use examples from a variety of religious and secular traditions to help us understand religion's sociological significance in the contemporary world.
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RELST 2515 : Anthropology of Iran
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2415, NES 2515 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the major debates that define the study of contemporary Iran. Drawing from ethnographic works, literary criticism, intellectual histories and more, we will examine historical events and cultural developments from a diverse set of theoretical approaches. Topics include the Iranian revolution in comparative perspective, the Iran-Iraq war and its continued legacy, media forms and practice, contemporary film and literature, women's movements, youth culture, religious diversity, legal systems, techniques of governance, and more. Of particular interest will be the intersections of religion and secularism in Iranian society. Ultimately, it is the objective of the course to explore the diverse cultural, political, and material worlds that shape collective life and individual subjectivity in Iran today.
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RELST 2575 : Myth and Religion in Mesopotamia
Crosslisted as: JWST 2575, NES 2575, NES 6575 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will survey the cultic practices and beliefs of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, the two major civilizations of Mesopotamia. We will examine the major myths of this region, e.g., Ishtar's Descent into the Netherworld, Etana, and Gilgamesh, in light of what they reveal about Mesopotamian religion, politics, and understanding of the afterlife. We will also examine the performance of magical rituals and incantations, methods of predicting the future, and the role of sacred marriage, prostitution, and slavery in the ancient temple.
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RELST 2626 : Modern Islam
Crosslisted as: NES 2626 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1798, Napoleon Bonaparte led a French expedition to Egypt, fighting a campaign that would extend to Syria and last three years. Napoleon's journey, however, signalled far more than the beginning of a military exercise: over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Muslims throughout the Middle East and South Asia came to engage with the ideas, technologies, and political power of Europe in unprecedented ways that deeply shaped the path of Islamic history. This course, in turn, explores these shifts over the past two centuries. It is designed to introduce students not only to the leading ideas and movements among Muslims over the past two hundred years, but also to how these ideas have shaped the lives of Muslims living in Muslim-majority countries and Muslim-minority countries alike. It will push students to consider how Islam has changed over the past two centuries and how these changes are similar to and different from the transformations that have emerged in other religious traditions. Topics will include: Gender and Modesty; Prayer and Ritual; Ethics; Constitutionalism; Sufism; and Modern Islamic Movements. Through these topics, students will examine the diverse contexts in which and methods by which Muslims have interpreted their foundational texts, and more generally, their often-competing understandings of Islam what it means to be a Muslim.
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RELST 2629 : New Testament/Early Christian Literatures
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2613, JWST 2629, NES 2629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a literary and historical introduction to the earliest Christian writings, especially those that eventually came to be included in the New Testament.  Through the lens of the Gospel narratives and earliest Christian letters, especially those of Paul, we will explore the rich diversity of the early Christian movement from its Jewish roots in first-century Palestine through its development and spread to Asia Minor and beyond.   We will give careful consideration to the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious circumstances that gave rise to the Jesus movement, as well as those that facilitated the emergence of various manifestations of Christian belief and practice.   The course will address themes like identity and ethnicity, conversion and debate, race and slavery, gender and sexuality, and the connections between politics and religion.
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RELST 2630 : Religion and Reason
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2530 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What must (or could) God be like, and what reasons do we have for thinking that a being of that sort actually exists? What difference would (or could) the existence of God make to our lives? Religion & Reason examines the idea, shared by several major world religions, that God must be an absolutely perfect being. What attributes must a perfect being have: must it have a mind, be a person, care for human beings? Is the concept of a perfect being coherent? Is the existence of a perfect being compatible with the presence of evil in the world, the existence of human freedom, the nature of the world as modern science understands it? Does what is morally right and wrong depend in any important way on the nature or will of a perfect being? Is a perfect being among the things that actually inhabit our universe? The course approaches these questions with the tools and methods of philosophical reason and through readings drawn from both classic texts and contemporary philosophical discussion.
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RELST 2640 : Histories of the Apocalypse: From Nostradamus to Nuclear Winter
Crosslisted as: HIST 2630 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Brexit, immigration, and the election of Donald Trump have all been recently heralded as signs of an imminent apocalypse. Films and fiction are saturated with images of zombies, environmental catastrophe, or nuclear disaster. Why are we so fascinated with the end of the world, and what is the genealogy of this imagery? What can visions of Armageddon tell us about past societal hopes and anxieties? How were they used to make claims about human nature and about who did and did not deserve salvation? This course traces apocalyptic thought from the Protestant reformation onwards, with a particular emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. Case studies range from radical millenarian sects to Chernobyl, and readings include all from Dostoevsky to Czech New Wave cinema. 
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RELST 2644 : Introduction to Judaism
Crosslisted as: JWST 2644, NES 2644 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jewish communities have been established, flourished and often struggled for millennia, throughout much of the world, and in vital contact with a vast range of other peoples and cultures. This course examines the constant and dynamic tension between that which unites Jews in all these different times and places, and that which makes every Jew a person of his or her own time and place. Our whirlwind tour will take us from ancient Israel, through Babylonia and the world of early Islam, into the medieval origins of Ashkenazi Jewry, down to Ottoman North Africa, and all the way across the Indian Ocean. We will learn how Jewish and other diaspora communities overcome challenges to maintain their distinctive identities, how to engage critically with the ways contemporary scholars the records of these far-flung communities, and how to generate their own critical questions.
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RELST 2655 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: HIST 2530, MEDVL 2655, NES 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
At the beginning of the 7th century, a new religion, Islam, appeared in Arabia and by the end of the century, Muslims had defeated the Byzantines and Persians and created an empire that stretched from Spain to India. For the next millennium, Islam glittered. Its caliphs, courts, and capitals were grander, more powerful, and more sophisticated than those of any medieval king, duke or prince. In this course, we will trace the emergence and development of Islamic civilization from the birth of Muhammad ca. 570 to the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. We will read the Qur'an and listen to its recitation; examine the career of the Prophet Muhammad; follow the course of the Arab conquests; explore the nature of the conflict between Sunnis and Shi'is; learn about the five pillars of Islam, sharia law, theology, and Sufism; and assess the achievements of Muslim intellectuals in literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy.
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RELST 2676 : Holy War, Crusade, and Jihad from Antiquity to Present
Crosslisted as: JWST 2676, MEDVL 2676, NES 2676 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Articulating and elaborating religious justifications for war is a cultural practice unique to the three monotheistic traditions and their respective textual communities. This notion and its practice have had profound historical consequences in the past that extend to and inform present-day global socio-political conflicts. The first part of this course will examine the origins of the concept of holy war, crusade and jihad and trace their cultural histories. The second part of the course will be devoted to discussing the ways in which contemporary discourses such as a "clash of civilizations," "the Evil Empire," "The Great Satan," and the "Axis of Evil" draw upon these respective cultural histories and explicitly or implicitly positing political conflict as a "battle for God."
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RELST 2724 : Introduction to the Hebrew Bible
Crosslisted as: JWST 2724, NES 2724 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is a repository of ancient Israelite religious, political, social, historical, and literary traditions. For the modern reader these ancient traditions are often obscured by a focus on the text as revelation. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the biblical world by reading the Hebrew Bible in translation, on its own terms, as a body of literature that evolved in an ancient Near Eastern context. The Bible itself will be the primary text for the course, but students will also be exposed to the rich and diverse textual traditions of the ancient Near East, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Moab, and Ugarit. In addition, this course will explore the impact of early biblical interpretation on shaping the monotheistic traditions inherited in the West. As participants in a secular course on the Bible, students will be challenged to question certain cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible, and will be expected to differentiate between a text's content and its presumed meaning.
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RELST 3309 : Temple in the World: Buddhism in Contemporary South and Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3309 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How do Buddhists live out their philosophies and ethics? What are the spaces of ritual, devotion, meditation, education, and politics? How do Buddhist practices and affiliations satisfy aesthetic and emotional needs and build social networks? This course explores the unfolding of Buddhist life in contemporary South and Southeast Asia, in locations such as Burma/Myanmar, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam, and Cambodia. 
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RELST 3311 : Performing Islam in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3311, ASIAN 6611, NES 3511 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What role does Islam take in the politics, history, arts and rituals of Southeast Asia? Structured as a seminar, this course takes you on a journey through Southeast Asia, home to almost a quarter of the global Muslim population, to explore how centuries of cultural mixing and layering have shaped the regions' religious outlook. How are local traditions and universal Islamic precepts reconciled? How is this manifested in the performative arts and rituals? How does Islam play out in governance and the law? How is Islam deployed in the transnational sphere? Previous knowledge of Islam is an advantage, but not a requisite to succeed in this course. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon throughout the course.
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RELST 3311 : Performing Islam in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3311, ASIAN 6611, NES 3511 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What role does Islam take in the politics, history, arts and rituals of Southeast Asia? Structured as a seminar, this course takes you on a journey through Southeast Asia, home to almost a quarter of the global Muslim population, to explore how centuries of cultural mixing and layering have shaped the regions' religious outlook. How are local traditions and universal Islamic precepts reconciled? How is this manifested in the performative arts and rituals? How does Islam play out in governance and the law? How is Islam deployed in the transnational sphere? Previous knowledge of Islam is an advantage, but not a requisite to succeed in this course. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon throughout the course.
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RELST 3312 : Music in World Religions
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How does music relate to the divine? This class investigates the dynamic nexus of music, theology, and socio-cultural forces in Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.  Students will acquire knowledge of a variety of musical systems and will think and write critically about topics including the role of gender in public and private worship, sacred song and protest, and artistic freedom and liturgical censure. Repertoire will range from Handel's Messiah to African American spirituals, 'cham (Tibetan ritual dance), tajwid (Qur'anic recitation), and bhajan (Hindu devotional music).  Semester-long projects in a religious tradition of each student's choice will combine traditional research methods with creative investigations tailored to individual skill sets (field work, composition, performance, analysis, …) Knowledge of Western notation not required.
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RELST 3416 : Zen Buddhism: The Landscape, the Human, Dwelling and Garden
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3316, ASIAN 6616, RELST 6616 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the Zen's central religious, historical and aesthetic developments. We read primary sources in translation and secondary sources. We examine the rise of the Ch'an tradition in China and the development of Northern and Southern Schools. In Japan, we examine the establishment of Zen in the Kamakura period, through the development of both Rinzai and Soto Zen, and early transmissions of Chinese texts and practices to Japan through Japanese emissaries. We study the lives and writings of Eisai and Dôgen, and explore how their works influenced later developments in Zen. Next we read works by Hakuin. Last, we study how Zen is implicated in Japanese fascism and later, postwar identity discourses. Finally, we look at Zen in an American context. This course is being taught both as an integrated arts in the curriculum course in collaboration with the Johnson Art Museum and is also part of a "Internationalizing the Cornell Curriculum Grant".  An optional 10-day trip to Japan to spend time in Zen temples and a monastery will be offered to students.  Furthermore, students studying Japanese  language can sign up for an optional 1-credit language course exploring Zen practice and arts vocabulary (JAPAN 2216).
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RELST 3550 : Origins of Monotheism
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3550, JWST 3550, NES 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
RELST 3629 : Greek New Testament Readings
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3629, JWST 3629, NES 3629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A weekly seminar that may be taken in addition to NES 2629. The seminar will provide an opportunity to read portions of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in Greek. We will work on grammatical and textual issues as well as other problems related to translations.
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RELST 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, CLASS 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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RELST 4100 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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RELST 4100 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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RELST 4240 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 4290, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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RELST 4441 : Mahayana Buddhism
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4441 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the origins and early developments of a movement in Indian Buddhism known as the Great Vehicle. We will intensively examine a small slice of this movement's voluminous literature so as to better understand its call for a new spiritual orientation within Buddhism. Topics of discussion will include the career of the bodhisattva, the lay/monk distinction, attitudes of Mahayanists toward women and other Buddhists, and the development of Buddhist utopias and transcendent buddhas. 
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RELST 4449 : History, Theory, and Methods in the Academic Study of Religion
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4449 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will explore the development of and variety in the academic discipline of Religious Studies. We will consider the emergence of secular approaches to the study of religion arising out of the European Enlightenment, and more particularly, the methods in the academic study of religion based upon different theoretical approaches. We will be particularly concerned to reflect upon the category of religious experience in modern discourses from historical, social, hermeneutical, neurobiological points of view. 
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RELST 4451 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4451, ASIAN 6631, FGSS 4451, FGSS 6331, LGBT 4451, LGBT 6331, PMA 4451 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings from feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films will be drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.
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RELST 4462 : Religion, Colonialism, and Nationalism in South and Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4462, ASIAN 6662 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Taught as a seminar, the course engages recent theoretical literature on the relations between religion, colonialism and nation formation.  This theoretical literature is read in conjunction with historical and ethnographic materials from South and Southeast Asian contexts, which allow us to explore the intellectual promise and limitations of the theoretical work in question.
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RELST 4537 : Shi'ism: Debates and Discourses
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4637, ANTHR 7637, NES 4537, NES 6537, RELST 6537 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a broad survey of contemporary Shi'i beliefs, practices, and politics with a focus on Twelver or Imami Shi'ism. Through a close examination of ethnographies, intellectual and political histories, theological writings, and more we will investigate the themes which define the politics and cultural practices of contemporary Shi'ism. In particular, we will highlight the ways in which Shi'is utilize their theological beliefs to negotiate and respond to the socio-political context of the times in which they live.  The course begins by examining the early days of what would later be called "Shi'ism." We then examine the key theological concepts which distinguish Shi'ism from Sunnism, including themes of adalat (divine justice), shahadat (martyrdom), the Karbala paradigm, and the role of the imamate and clerical class. The rest of course is devoted to investigating the ways that Shi'ism informs and interacts with the social realm and vice versa, ranging from negotiations of the everyday to responding to moments of great civil and society unrest and to that which is called "sectarianism". Travelling from South Asia to the Middle East, from Africa to America, we will ultimately examine how Shi'i beliefs and identity act as a dynamic force for shaping the worlds in which they live today.
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RELST 4626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Narratives, particularly sacred narratives, are not static or fixed but rather infinitely flexible and malleable.   Subject to multiple retellings—elaborations, modifications, and deletions—stories take on lives of their own even after they come to be written down. What happens to sacred stories when they are heard and read by different communities of interpreters? This is the broad question at the heart of this course, which will explore the diverse interpretations of biblical narratives (e.g., stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and his disciples, Joseph and Mary) found in Jewish and Christian literature from the second century BCE through the 6th century and beyond.  Writers like the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher Philo and the Jewish historian Josephus, Jewish and Christian pseudepigrapha and apocrypha, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament, gnostic literature, early rabbinic literature, and Christian patristic writers—these are some of the sources that we will study in this class.    At the conclusion of the seminar, we will explore briefly the retellings of biblical stories and use of biblical characters in the early Islamic materials, especially the Qur'an.    Throughout the semester, we will consider the historical contexts of biblical interpretation and the production, transmission, and use of texts in antiquity, including questions about literacy and orality, education, and the physical forms of ancient books.
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RELST 4660 : Global Religious Revival of the 1970's
Crosslisted as: NES 4660, NES 6650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the 1960s, religiosity was said to be a mere byproduct of tradition, increasingly marginalized by modernization. Yet, in an unexpected turn, the 1970s saw religious revival swept across the globe as societies from the Middle East to Latin America to the United States turned to their divine texts. In the four decades since, religious movements across the world have gained increasingly prominent positions in society and government. How do these mass movements happen? What exactly is the relation between specific revivals, their holy texts and the societies in which they arise? How do they affect politics? Are contemporary religious revivals broadly similar or do they contain geographical or religious particularities? In this seminar, we will begin to examine these questions through the prism of social movement theory, covering the Islamic Revival in Egypt, Religious Zionism in Israel, the rise of Liberation Theology in Latin America and the "Moral Majority" in the United States.  Drawing on texts, audio recordings, and video, we will explore how and why men and women turned to religion since the 1970s and how the practices of individual believers have shaped the relationship between religion and politics globally. Courses in varied religious traditions would be helpful, but are not a requirement, to succeed in this seminar.
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RELST 4665 : Augustine
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4665, MEDVL 6210, PHIL 4210, PHIL 6210 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination of Augustine's wide-ranging reflections on the nature of mind, giving special attention to his later, major works: Confessions, De trinitate, and De genesi ad litteram.
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RELST 4990 : Directed Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
For undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or do extensive reading on a special topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course.
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RELST 4991 : Directed Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or do extensive reading on a special topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course.
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RELST 4995 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
RELST 4995 is the first course in the Honors two-part sequence. The Honors Program is open to Religious Studies majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. While admissions to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Religious Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
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RELST 4995 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
RELST 4995 is the first course in the Honors two-part sequence. The Honors Program is open to Religious Studies majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. While admissions to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Religious Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
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RELST 4996 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
RELST 4996 is the second course in the Honors two-part sequence. The Honors Program is open to Religious Studies majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. While admissions to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Religious Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
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RELST 4996 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
RELST 4996 is the second course in the Honors two-part sequence. The Honors Program is open to Religious Studies majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. While admissions to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Religious Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
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RELST 6020 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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RELST 6020 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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RELST 6290 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, ANTHR 7490, FGSS 4290, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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RELST 6537 : Shi'ism: Debates and Discourses
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4637, ANTHR 7637, NES 4537, NES 6537, RELST 4537 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a broad survey of contemporary Shi'i beliefs, practices, and politics with a focus on Twelver or Imami Shi'ism. Through a close examination of ethnographies, intellectual and political histories, theological writings, and more we will investigate the themes which define the politics and cultural practices of contemporary Shi'ism. In particular, we will highlight the ways in which Shi'is utilize their theological beliefs to negotiate and respond to the socio-political context of the times in which they live.  The course begins by examining the early days of what would later be called "Shi'ism." We then examine the key theological concepts which distinguish Shi'ism from Sunnism, including themes of adalat (divine justice), shahadat (martyrdom), the Karbala paradigm, and the role of the imamate and clerical class. The rest of course is devoted to investigating the ways that Shi'ism informs and interacts with the social realm and vice versa, ranging from negotiations of the everyday to responding to moments of great civil and society unrest and to that which is called "sectarianism". Travelling from South Asia to the Middle East, from Africa to America, we will ultimately examine how Shi'i beliefs and identity act as a dynamic force for shaping the worlds in which they live today.
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RELST 6616 : Zen Buddhism: The Landscape, the Human, Dwelling and Garden
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3316, ASIAN 6616, RELST 3416 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the Zen's central religious, historical and aesthetic developments. We read primary sources in translation and secondary sources. We examine the rise of the Ch'an tradition in China and the development of Northern and Southern Schools. In Japan, we examine the establishment of Zen in the Kamakura period, through the development of both Rinzai and Soto Zen, and early transmissions of Chinese texts and practices to Japan through Japanese emissaries. We study the lives and writings of Eisai and Dôgen, and explore how their works influenced later developments in Zen. Next we read works by Hakuin. Last, we study how Zen is implicated in Japanese fascism and later, postwar identity discourses. Finally, we look at Zen in an American context. This course is being taught both as an integrated arts in the curriculum course in collaboration with the Johnson Art Museum and is also part of a "Internationalizing the Cornell Curriculum Grant".  An optional 10-day trip to Japan to spend time in Zen temples and a monastery will be offered to students.  Furthermore, students studying Japanese  language can sign up for an optional 1-credit language course exploring Zen practice and arts vocabulary (JAPAN 2216).
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RELST 6626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 4626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Narratives, particularly sacred narratives, are not static or fixed but rather infinitely flexible and malleable.   Subject to multiple retellings—elaborations, modifications, and deletions—stories take on lives of their own even after they come to be written down. What happens to sacred stories when they are heard and read by different communities of interpreters? This is the broad question at the heart of this course, which will explore the diverse interpretations of biblical narratives (e.g., stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and his disciples, Joseph and Mary) found in Jewish and Christian literature from the second century BCE through the 6th century and beyond.  Writers like the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher Philo and the Jewish historian Josephus, Jewish and Christian pseudepigrapha and apocrypha, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament, gnostic literature, early rabbinic literature, and Christian patristic writers—these are some of the sources that we will study in this class.    At the conclusion of the seminar, we will explore briefly the retellings of biblical stories and use of biblical characters in the early Islamic materials, especially the Qur'an.    Throughout the semester, we will consider the historical contexts of biblical interpretation and the production, transmission, and use of texts in antiquity, including questions about literacy and orality, education, and the physical forms of ancient books.
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